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Posts Tagged ‘Heating Repair’

Having Trouble Heating Your Home this Winter? Here’s What To Do

Monday, December 10th, 2018

Relaxing on cold winter's nightIt’s winter here in Eugene! That means cozy winter nights curled up indoors, hot cocoa, and holidays. We hope that you’re not having any problems with your heating system, but if you are, then we have service professionals ready to fix any heating problem that you might have. When you’re having trouble with your heating system, you need a professional. No video you watch on YouTube or article you read on WikiHow is ever going to be enough to substitute the expertise of a trained professional. If you need heating repair in Eugene, OR, contact our team today. If you want to know why your heater is acting up and what to do about it, keep reading below.

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A Ductless Heating Unit on the Wall Is Sagging—What’s Wrong?

Monday, January 22nd, 2018

ductless-mini-split-on-wallDuctless heating and cooling systems grow in popularity with each year. For new home construction, going with a ductless mini split heat pump is a great way to have more design freedom. There are many other benefits of using ductless heating, such as overall cost savings, improvements in indoor air quality, and the ease of repairs.

Speaking of repairs, if your home is equipped with a ductless heating and cooling system, you may need to have professionals fix problems on occasion. The best ductless mini splits should rarely run into malfunctions, but there are a few specific troubles that can affect them. One of them is when an indoor air handler—the basic units that send heated and cooled air into a room—appears to be sagging on the wall. What’s going on, and how urgent is the problem?

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Why Is My Furnace Causing a Tripped Circuit Breaker?

Monday, February 20th, 2017

3-natural-gas-burnersWe’re still experiencing cold and rainy weather here in Oregon, and we can expect to have these conditions for a few weeks. (After all, that’s what we’ve come to expect in a state that gets this much rain.) We aren’t out of the woods yet when it comes to winter weather, so make sure that you are keeping a close watch on potential problems with your furnace or other heating system.

One problem that can occur with a furnace during this time of the year is that it starts to trip the circuit breaker when it turns on. This is something that you can’t ignore! If this happens, don’t simply keep resetting the circuit breaker and trying to carry on for as long as you can until the breaker trips once more. A circuit breaker trips for a reason—to protect the circuit from a large voltage surge—and whenever one trips, it’s a warning that something is wrong.

But… what’s wrong? We’ll take a look below.

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Is Your Radiant Heating System Leaking?

Monday, January 2nd, 2017

There are some great reasons why radiant floor-heating systems are becoming more and more popular: they are incredibly energy efficient, last for many years, and provide a sensation of warmth (from right beneath people’s icy toes) that’s more comfortable and cozy than using conventional forced-air systems, i.e. furnaces and heat pumps.

If you have a radiant floor heating system, it was probably built into the house when it was constructed. You’re used to the system simply working whenever you want it, and haven’t had to give it much more thought. But this type of heater can suffer from malfunctions, just like any other type, and it’s important to detect the signs early so you can call for repairs.

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Take Your Furnace for a Test Run before Winter

Monday, October 17th, 2016

Cooler weather has arrived here in Eugene, and the actual cold weather won’t be far behind. There are still a few more weeks to go before the winter sets in, and it’s a good idea to take advantage of this period to find out if your furnace has any malfunctions that need to be repaired. You don’t want to find out later, during one of the coldest days of the year, that your furnace is in serious trouble! We recommend that you give your furnace a short test run before you have to regularly depend on it.

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Why Won’t My Heat Pump Switch Over to Heating Mode?

Monday, October 10th, 2016

As we start to move into the cooler time of the year, our heat pumps will beging switching over to their heating modes. Eventually, they’ll be set in heating mode for good—or at least until spring comes around!

But what if you turn on your heat pump for the first time, or the second or third time, and it won’t change over and start blowing our warm air? Obviously, this is a problem. There are a couple of possible explanations for this behavior, which we’ll examine below.

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Do You Need a New Heater Before This Winter?

Monday, September 21st, 2015

It may seem a far way off still, but it really isn’t: the cold weather. If you ended last heating season with a heating system that barely made it, it’s probably time to start reviewing your choices for a replacement heating system. Today’s homeowner’s have a lot of choices, and beginning the replacement process now with your Comfort Flow Heating HVAC specialist will give you the time to review the different systems available and make a choice that fits the needs of your home and your family very well.

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What You Need to Know About the Limit Switch

Thursday, February 5th, 2015

You may or may not be aware of this, but your heating system is actually covered in all manner of switches, valves, and other devices designed as safety measures. There are hundreds of different ways that a heating system could begin malfunctioning, and some of the major ones could end up severely damaging the system or proving dangerous to the home’s occupants. That is why so many safety measures are in place, and why you should know about them. Let’s take a look at one of the most important safety measures: the limit switch.

What is the Limit Switch?

The limit switch is a small part that measures the temperature inside your heating system. Specifically, it measures the temperature of the plenum, the largest chamber of any forced air heater. It is designed to shut down the system in the event that the temperature inside the plenum gets too high. Obviously, an overheating system presents a fire risk, not to mention the damage it can cause to parts that are not designed to withstand that level of heat. As such, the limit switch is one of the most important safety measures in your heating system.

However, there are some interactions between the limit switch and the heater of which you should be aware. Foremost among these is short-cycling.

Short-Cycling

Short-cycling is what happens when the heating system won’t stop rapidly turning itself on and off throughout the day. When a heater begins to overheat, it activates the limit switch, which shuts the system down to protect it. However, the limit switch doesn’t actually address whatever problem is causing the system to overheat. When the system has cooled off a bit, the thermostat reactivates it, as it hasn’t reached the desired temperature in the home yet. So, the system restarts and overheats again because the issue hasn’t been solved. This leads to an endless cycle of the system overheating and the limit switch shutting it off.

This behavior is extremely harmful to the heating system, putting it under exponentially more strain than it is designed to handle, and increasing the chances of a breakdown. If you notice this behavior, call a professional immediately.

If you’d like to know more, call Comfort Flow Heating to schedule an appointment with us today. We provide professional heating repair services in the Eugene, OR area.

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Some Reasons Why Your Burner Won’t Stay Lit

Friday, October 17th, 2014

If your gas-burning heating unit isn’t working, the first thing you probably do is check the pilot light, right? What happens when the pilot light is lit, but the heat still won’t turn on? Chances are, it’s a problem with your burner. Below are some reasons why your burner won’t stay lit.

Malfunctioning Flame Sensor

The flame sensor is responsible for regulating the gas flow to the burner. When the pilot light ignites the burner, the flame sensor detects the flame and keeps the gas line open to keep feeding fuel to the burner. A malfunctioning sensor will not detect the flame, and so will not open the gas line to keep the burner going.

Gas Line Blockage

If your burner lights for a short time but then goes out, you may have a blockage in the gas valve. The gas line is what provides fuel to the burner to keep it lit. A complete blockage often prevents the burner from lighting at all. A partial blockage, however, may allow the burner to light but will not provide enough fuel to keep it lit.

Pressure Switch

A pressure switch is a safety feature installed on more modern systems. If it detects that your system venting pressure is off, it will shut down your heating system to prevent it from venting poisonous gas into your home. This isn’t really a problem with your burners, but from your point of view it can look very much like the burner is having trouble staying lit. Venting problems are often caused by other serious issues, like cracked heat exchangers or a blocked exhaust flue.

No matter what is causing your burners to malfunction, you’ll need a professional to diagnose and fix the problem. If your heating system is experiencing problems, call Comfort Flow Heating. We conduct heating repairs all over the Eugene area.

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What Causes Cracks in a Heat Exchanger?

Friday, October 10th, 2014

A cracked heat exchanger is one of the most serious issues that your furnace can develop. In furnaces, the heat exchanger is designed to direct combustion byproducts to the exhaust flue on one side and warm air into the house on the other. A cracked heat exchanger can cause combustion byproducts like carbon monoxide to mix with the air being circulated into the house. Practically all of the combustion byproducts from a furnace are toxic, and can cause death in high amounts. In the interest of helping prevent this issue, we’ve assembled a list of causes for cracked heat exchangers.

Overheating

If an air filter becomes too dirty, it can block most of the airflow through the heat exchanger. This causes heat to become trapped in the heat exchanger, where it will put the part under enormous strain. This is one of the most common causes of cracked heat exchangers. It’s also one of the reasons that changing your air filter every month is recommended.

Oversized Furnace

An oversized furnace presents a number of problems for you entire heating system. For the heat exchanger in particular, the constant short-cycling common to oversized furnaces will cause the metal pipes to rapidly expand and contract. Over time, this increased stress can open cracks. An oversized furnace can also cause the heat exchanger to overheat.

Age

Even if you take good care of your heating system, the heat exchanger can simply crack from years of use. The natural cycle of expansion and contraction will cause the metal in your heat exchanger to wear out after enough time. It is far better to have this happen after a couple decades of use, however, than to have to potentially replace your entire furnace after 5 years due to preventable issues.

Regardless of how the problem occurs, the important thing is that you replace a cracked heat exchanger as soon as possible. It might be a pain, but the alternative is much worse. If you think you may have a cracked heat exchanger, call Comfort Flow Heating. We conduct heating repairs throughout the Eugene region.

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