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How Can Faulty Ductwork Affect My Air Conditioner?

It’s the middle of summer, and even we get hot in Eugene, OR. This is the time of year when we count on our air conditioning systems to provide the cool air we need. Like many homeowners, you had your AC system maintained by one of our professionals at the beginning of the season, but for some reason, you still aren’t getting the performance you should. So now we have to ask: how’s your ductwork? Faulty ductwork can have a big, negative effect on your summer cooling, and that may actually be the problem.

Signs of Faulty Ductwork

First, it’s important to know what the signs of faulty ductwork look like. Here are some of the most common ones:

  • Significant increase in dust in your home – when your ductwork is faulty, many kinds of particles can enter it, and then get direct delivery to the living spaces of your home.
  • Increase in indoor humidity – outside moisture can and will enter your faulty ductwork, increasing the humidity level in your home.
  • Development of mold and/or mildew – with excess moisture entering your system, mold and mildew can develop easily inside your ductwork.

Now that you know what to look for, it’s important to understand how faulty ductwork can affect your air conditioner. The first major effect you’ll see will be the amount of extra work your AC will have to do. Why? Your air conditioner has to compensate for the loss of air caused by your faulty ductwork, which means it has to work harder. Because of this, two other problems emerge: your air conditioner will need more power in order to cool your home, and it will also begin to wear down more quickly due to the extra work its performing. The bottom line? Faulty ductwork can be a huge burden for your AC system, so it’s important to have it serviced by trained experts, like the ones at Comfort Flow Heating.

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